Camping with a Dog: Tips & Advice

Camping With A Dog

Are you ready to go camping with a dog and now looking for tips and advice? Look no further: at Campsited, we got you covered and we can also help you in booking the perfect campsite for camping with your dog.

Camping with dogs involves different rules, and it’s good practice to be aware of those based on the chosen destination.

But, first of all, let us be upfront about what it takes to ensure that camping with dogs is a successful venture.

Training is key

Training should be a huge priority for anyone with a dog but if you intend to go camping with your four legged baby, it is even more critical. Training keeps everyone happy – your fellow campers, your dog and you.

Campsites are fascinating places for dogs, there are a whole load of new smells and terrains to explore, and… hey, is that a stick, and a tree, and woah, another dog?! That is just a bite size commentary of what is possibly running through your dog’s mind as soon as he or she jumps out of the car.

If you haven’t trained your dog before you get to a campsite to listen and obey your instructions, you’re in for the holiday from hell.

Consider the dog baby’s feelings

This one is not as touchy feely as it sounds! We camp to get away from a busy, digitally “on” lifestyle. Camping trips are all about not switching on a laptop or tablet and eventually kicking back with a very archaic instrument called a book.

Dogs don’t and nor do they enjoy books. They want to explore their new environment. Making sure they get a good dose of exercise takes care of the dog’s needs and makes for a calm, relaxed animal.

However, there is a word of caution to heed here too for energetic people who go camping with dogs. Dogs do get tired and over-exercise is not a good idea either, especially when the weather is warm or hot. Make sure that there is a lot of water for your dog at your tent and if you’re going on a hike, take water and a bowl with you so your dog can get regular water breaks.

Consider fellow campers’ feelings

Part of going on a camping trip for anyone, lazy or not, is getting back to the outdoors.

Campsites that allow dogs often have clear instructions on where the pets can be off the lead and where they need to be on the lead.

This goes a long way to making sure that people treat you with goodwill as they see you make an effort to consider their feelings.

Poop

There is no other way to put this – pick it up! Not everyone is madly in love with dogs and dog poop lying around does little to improve their feelings. Bring doggy poop bags with you when you camp and use them. End of.

Keep accessories to a minimum

Recent years have seen the sales of backpacks for dogs soar. These can be handy but vets do not recommend that you use them until your dog is fully grown. And even when your dog is an adult, please keep the backpacks light.

Carrying too heavy a backpack for a long period can be damaging to your dog’s joints. It’s also advised that you put whatever your dog is carrying over their shoulders and not over their spine.

Lights

In the dark you’ll want to be able to see where your dog is and a light attached to their collar is a brilliant way to do this. A cycling light is perfect and so are glow stick bracelets!

First aid kits

Don’t leave home without it. It isn’t a pleasant thought to entertain, but just as a human can get hurt or ill on a trip, so can our pets. You can mitigate a lot of the harm that can come to them by making sure you have a dedicated dog first aid kit packed in the car when you go on trips.

Make sure you have your own vet’s number saved on your phone in case you need to call for emergency advice, and do a bit of research online before you go regarding the closest vet or animal emergency clinic in the area you are camping.

Essential items for your dog first aid kit

This list may be long but many of the items are once off purchases.

  • Scissors – needed to cut bandages and matted fur…it happens.
  • Tweezers – removing splinters or debris in a wound is easier with a tweezer.
  • Antiseptic wash/wipes – don’t be tempted to clean a wound with alcohol, it can sting and cause an infection.
  • Thermometer – ask your vet to educate you on what a dog’s vital signs are.
  • Antibiotic topical ointment – handy for small skin wounds. Make sure though that your dog can’t lick it. I know… easier said than done but gauze and bandages help.
  • Gauze and bandages – don’t ever wrap too tightly.
  • Toenail trimmer – in case of torn toenails. To reduce the chance of this happening, keep your dog’s toenails trimmed as a matter of course.
  • Painkillers – your vet will recommend dog friendly painkillers. Don’t use human painkillers for your dog as they can make your dog ill, and in worst cases be fatal.
  • Medical tape
  • Syringe – helpful to administer liquids and to flush out eyes
  • Latex gloves

Prepare your dog for the adventure

Make sure you have your dog used to the car before you embark on a camping trip. Most dogs find their “car legs” quickly but that comes with repeated exposure to the vehicle. Set your tent up in your backyard, if you have one, and invite your dog in so that he or she can give it the once over.

Dog lovers the world over will tell you that there is nothing like the companionship these animals bring. It’s great to see offices and social places starting to capitalise on the fact that people want to take their dogs with them while they go about their day.

How to find dog friendly campsites

At Campsited we are here to help you find the perfect dog friendly campsite to suit your budget and camping style, ensuring your camping adventure will be an enjoyable and unforgettable experience.

We can also help you with suggestions and advice to get your holiday finalised and booked with ease.

Click here to start and book a great dog friendly campsite for your next holiday. 

Your dream camping holiday with your dog is just a few clicks away!

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *